Three more new paintings

All, completed this past winter and spring.  I’ve been working with watersoluble embroidery stabilizer and the possibilities of using it on old failed paintings.  All three of these have been done previously on stretched quarter sheet 140lb Arches paper.  All are done with water soluble media as well as art markers and the embroidery stabilizer.

This is called “Cracks” AND I think it has two layers of failed paintings underneath.

This is “Alien House.”

 

And this is “Acentric Heraldry” and has a couple of layers underneath as well as some thick collage which adds to the texture of this top layer.  The small centers of the black spots are pieces of gold colored ribbon.

I still have about five or six more that are not quite finished, but will be soon, and I’ll present those next.

Comments always welcomed and encouraged.  🙂

Three New Paintings

All completed this winter and early spring.  This one is called “Transformation” and is mixed media, 15×11″. Includes old house paint and watercolor, gesso and embroidery stabilizer as well as acrylic ink.

This one is “Gentleness.” It’s an acrylic pour done on mat board that was prepared with Gloss Medium on both sides.  The lines added later are acrylic ink, done with an old fashioned nib. It’s 15×11″.

And the last in this post is “Cladonia” which is an acrylic pour on Yupo.  It looks a lot like the lichen “British Soldiers” which is very common in the woods Up North.  It’s 13×10″.

 

 

New Acrylic Pour Painting an 8×8″ Tile

This started as an acrylic pour in black, yellow and red.  It was nice cells, but otherwise didn’t have much interest. From another pour I had some drippings that looked like petals, so I added them forming a flower shape.  The center was another piece of “pour puddle” which I enhanced with some brown dots of acrylic.  The acrylic pieces when peeled off the freezer paper they were on, adhered immediately and permantently to the acrylic pour on the tile.   I outlined the whole flower and stem with yellow acrylic and enhanced some of the yellow lines from the pour.  I like it very much now.

Now I’m giving it a couple more coats of UV Varnish and adding some hanging loops on the back, so I can string some picture wire on them and hang it as a normal painting.

Comments appreciated.

Sneak Preview of Embroidery Stabilizer’s Power

This started out as a quite nice large swipe pour on a 26×20″ Yupo. There were a few details I wanted to change, but started using it as a spot to experiment with. Since then it’s gotten three layers of pours and various other splashes of acrylic paint on it, so it’s quite thick and getting heavy–but I can still lift it, so wil keep going on it.  Here’s what it looks like now. 

And, below are two close-ups of areas of particular interest, especially from the viewpoint of a pour.  You’ll also notice there’s lots of color and contrast, and a marked disjointedness of the whole thing.   Here’s those two areas of interest.  The first is the right upper corner where I  just poured some paint and then moved it around by blowing at it with a straw.  I was surprised at the effect this had.

Then, the second one is from the area of the bright yellow patches in the left upper quadrant.  Those two pieces of yellow are from the bottom of a cup that had paint from a previous pour.  I was able to pull it out, and just pressed it down on the painting.  Now I’m going to try and pull it all together using Embroidery Stabilizer.

Thanks for your comments.

Finished?

Wetland Sunset

This piece was started as a pour demonstration. It was poured on a large 30×20″ black Foamcore board.  It started out looking beautiful, with strong and varied cells throughout, and  with three jabs of the large piece of Yupo I was using to swipe with. But unfortunately the board started buckling mainly longitudinally, so most of the cells ran off the sides long before it had set up.

I’ve added a couple of black lines to it to emphasize the three diagonally oriented lines, that strongly remind me of cattails in the swamp near us.   I did another piece very similar colors but used Yupo as the medium for it.  Turned out much better. I’ll show that next time as I’m still adding some details to it.

Thanks for looking.  Do you see anything that needs correcting or adding.  Love to hear your comments–any way you see it.

 

Finished Painting After Revision using Embroidery Stabilizer

This painting was originally starged in November 2009, and has lain in my unfinished pile since. Decided it would be a good one to demonatrate the capabilities of using Embroidery Stabilizer, instead of just covering it with a heavy coat of Gesso. To see the process that started the path to the final painting see my post of October 26. (http://merleplaggeart.com/dir/?p=1000)

Just below is an enlarged area of the lower right of the painting. It shows annotation of what the various visual textures are a result of.

Thanks much for looking and checking this out. It really is a neat way for redoing an old painting that has not been one of your favorites. Any comments are gratefully appreciated.

Finished Piece: Combination of a Pour and Pour-Skins

High Wire Act 20×16″ on stretched cotton canvas
Most of the larger shapes are dried skins from pours. The fine lines and straight lines are archival markers.

I’ve been looking at this for a couple weeks and can’t decide anything to add, so I’ll call it finished.  I won’t varnish it just yet–keeping it out of sight for a while will give me fresh eyes to see it again in a couple months and then prepare it for selling.

For an earlier version of this piece see my post of October 14, 2017.  Any comments?  Thanks for visiting.

Crackling Textures – Methods and Results

A Review of methods of producing crackled texture effects in paintings.

  1. Crackle Paste – A Golden product that requires a rigid substrate and thick application. Doesn’t work on Yupo or paper. Somewhat chalky.
  2.  Kroma Crackle – from Kroma Industries. Relatively new product. Thinner application and can be used on flexible substrate. Takes a long time to dry–even in the winter time with humidity low in the studio.  It is somewhat fragile when it starts to dry.  Can easily be limited to smaller areas. Dries to a chalky white color, with the darker color underneath as the cracks. Then it can be painted on top as desired, with either watercolor or acrylic paint.

    Kroma Crackle – after completely dry. Cracks vary according to the thickness of the application. A few pieces of the dry compound have brushed off in handling.
  3. Crackle Glaze – made by Poly Vine Industries. Designed to be used with flat Latex paint. Gives interesting cracked effect.  And looks good, and probably can easily be localized as needed and still look natural.

    Surface after Crackle Glaze used. On the left hand two thirds it was painted with a very light blue latex interior paint. On the right I used gesso, tinted a bit with blue India ink.
  4. Stamping – totally repetitive and no control over size of crackles. The stamp I have has rather large spaces.
  5. Organic based spray paint over water wetted substrate. Can be on a flexible substrate, but very unstable and fragile till coated with fixative of some sort. I have used this in multiple paintings on Yupo with good, quite subtle results. Generally limited to small areas. Not predictable size of cracks.

    Black commercial spray paint (in pressurized cans) over a wet surface of reddish acrylic paint.
  6. Dirty Pour – simulates crackling a little bit in some areas, but totally unpredictable and very hard to control in all aspects.
  7. Hand painting … very tedious and almost impossible  to get looking natural.

Conclusion: come back next time, hopefully in a few days.  In the meantime, thanks for reading, and if you have any questions or additions please comment. The link is just under the title.

Problems With Dirty Pours

People have complained about the smell of using Silicone spray in doing their dirty pours.  The solution is two-fold: Use an already liquid silicone oil, or make your own oil.  I have a 2 oz. dropper bottle that I take outside and spray the silicone from the pressurized container into the  bottle.  This eliminates the odor of the spray itself when using it indoors. Then I can just add 5-8 drops of this silicone to each color cup with almost no odor.

Here’s the way it looks:

Notice the tip of the tubing is a little less than half way into the bottle. This allows the liquid silicone to run into the bottom of the bottle and the propellant to come out without loss of the oil. Also note that I’m spraying into the side of the bottle.

Have you found any other ways of dealing with the odor of the spray?  If so please say in the comments.  Thanks.